Task Example 2: Hashcat on Golem

List of actions needed to execute the hashcat example.

This section contains steps you need to execute in order to run our hashcat password-recovery example. As this tutorial is designed to inspire you to create your own Golem applications, we will explain all the needed details of Golem application implementation.

This example illustrates following Golem features & aspects:

  • VM runtime

  • Task execution

  • Parallel task execution on multiple provider

  • Submitting multiple task sequences to a singleGolem engine

  • Setting timeout for commands run on a provider

  • Reading output from commands run on a provider

  • File transfer to/from provider's exe unit

What is hashcat?

Hashcat is a command-line utility that finds unknown passwords from their known hashes.

Hashcat is a very powerful tool. It supports 320 hashing algorithms and 5 different attack types. We will use only the "phpass" algorithm and a simple brute-force attack.

First, we need to precisely define the "finding a password" problem. Let's assume we have a hash obtained from processing of an unknown password using the "phpass" algorithm.

Phpass is used as a hashing method by e.g. WordPress and Drupal. Those are free/open-source web frameworks used to run PHP-based websites.

The password hash is stored in in.hash file and the hash is:

$P$5ZDzPE45CLLhEx/72qt3NehVzwN2Ry/

We're going to assume that we know the password mask. It is:

?a?a?a

That means that the password consists of 3 alphanumeric characters.

Now we can try to find the password, matching the given hash and mask, by calling:

hashcat -a 3 -m 400 in.hash ?a?a?a

The parameters are:

  • a 3 - use a brute-force attack. There are 5 other types of attacks.

  • m 400 - password is hashed with the phpass algorithm. There are 320 other alghoritms supported by hashcat.

  • in.hash - name of a file containing the hashed password

  • ?a?a?a - mask to use

The complete hashcat arguments reference is available here: https://hashcat.net/wiki/doku.php?id=hashcat

As a result of the above call, the hashcat.potfile will be created with the following content:

$P$5ZDzPE45CLLhEx/72qt3NehVzwN2Ry/:pas

where pas is the password which had been unknown to us and was just retrieved by hashcat.

Obviously, for longer passwords, the presented usage of hashcat could be problematic as it would require a lot more processing time (e.g. days or even months) to find a password with such a naive method.

To showcase how a similar problem can be resolved faster, we created the Golem version of hashcat. It uses the computing power of many providers at the same time. Parallelized password recovery can be much quicker - instead of days or months, this Golem version is likely to solve the problem in hours.

Doings things in parallel

How to make hashcat work in parallel? The answer is quite simple: the keyspace concept. We can ask the tool to tell us what the size of the possibility space (keyspace) is for the given mask and algorithm:

hashcat --keyspace -a 3 ?a?a?a -m 400

As a result, we will receive an answer in the standard output. In our case it is 9025.

Now we can divide the 0..9025 space into separate fragments. Assuming we want to allow our app to use up to 3 separate workers (which means up to 3 providers), those parts would be:

  • 0..3008

  • 3009..6016

  • 6017..9025

To process only the part of the whole 0..9025 space, we use the --skip and --limit options:

hashcat -a 3 -m 400 in.hash --skip 3009 --limit 6016 ?a?a?a

The above call will process the 3009..6016 part. If there is any result in that range it will be written to the hashcat.potfile.

Before we begin

In order to develop applications for the Golem network, you need to install yagna daemon on your machine. We're going to assume you're already familiar with the setup of the environment required to run Python high-level API examples. If you're not, please make sure you proceed through our quick primer to get up to speed:

Once you're done with the tutorial above, make sure you're again in yapapi's main directory and move to:

cd examples/yacat

So now, we're going to assume that:

  • The yagna deamon is running in the background.

  • The YAGNA_APPKEY environment variable is set to the value of the generated app key.

  • The payment is initialized with yagna payment init -sender (please keep in mind that it needs initialization after each launch of yagna service run).

  • The virtual python environment for our tutorial is activated.

  • Dependencies are installed and the yapapi repository (containing the tutorial examples) is cloned.

  • In your current directory (examples/yacat) there are two files that will be used and discussed in this example:

    • yacat.Dockerfile - the Docker file used for the definition of the provider's container images

    • yacat.py - requestor agent's entry point which deals with orchestration of the container runs.

Let's get to work - the Dockerfile

Let's start with the Dockerfile (yacat.Dockerfile). Do we always need a dedicated Dockerfile for our own Golem application?

Golem is designed to use existing Docker images, so you can use any existing docker image. There are no Golem-specific conditions that need to be met by the image.

If there is (for example on the docker hub) no docker image that you need, you will have to create a custom one.

For the yacat example we're going to use an off-the-shelf hashcat image (dizcza/docker-hashcat:intel-cpu) and just slightly modify it for Golem. Resultant Dockerfile is included in the example as yacat.Dockerfile:

FROM dizcza/docker-hashcat:intel-cpu
VOLUME /golem/input /golem/output
WORKDIR /golem/entrypoint

As Golem does not need any specific elements in the Dockerfile,yacat.Dockerfileis more or less a standard Dockerfile.

VOLUME: the input/output

The one thing we need to remember while preparing the Dockerfile is to define a place (or places) in the container file system that will be used for the file transfer. We are going to use input (from requestor to the provider) and output (from provider to the requestor) file transfers here.

The volume is defined in the last line of the above Dockerfile:

VOLUME /golem/input /golem/output

This makes /golem/input and /golem/output locations we will use for our input/output file transfer. For the requestor agent code, which we are going to discuss in the next chapter, we need to know the volume (or volumes) name(s) and use it as a directory for the file transfers.

On the provider side, all the content of the VOLUME directories is stored in the provider's os file system.

All the changes in other (non VOLUME mounted) container directories content are kept in RAM. The rest of the VM image file system (not changed, non VOLUME mounted) content is stored as VM image in the provider's os file system.

Please mind that tasks within a single worker instance - so effectively part of the same activity on a given provider node - run within the same virtual machine and share the contents of a VOLUME between each other.

That means that as long as the execution takes place on the same provider, and thus, on the same filesystem, files in the VOLUME left over from one task execution will be present in a subsequent run.

If your provider-side code creates large temporary files, you should store them in the directory defined as VOLUME. Otherwise, the large files will be stored in RAM. RAM usually has a capacity limit much lower than disk space.

Important note about Docker's ENTRYPOINT

Because of how Golem's VM execution unit works, the Docker's usual ENTRYPOINT statement present in the Dockerfiles is effectively ignored and replaced with the exeunit's own entrypoint.

The net effect for you, the developer, is that - at least for the time being - you cannot rely on that feature in your Dockerfiles. Instead, you can pass the relevant commands from the requestor agent as part of the execution script after the image is deployed and started on provider's VM. This will be shown in the next step of this tutorial.

Build process

Now we may proceed with a regular Docker build, using yacat.Dockerfile:

docker build . -f yacat.Dockerfile -t yacat

As Golem cannot currently use raw docker images and uses its own, optimized gvmkit image format, we have to convert our Docker image the following way:

pip install gvmkit-build
gvmkit-build yacat
gvmkit-build yacat --push

The important fact is that the last of the above commands, will provide us with a gvmkit image hash, that looks like this:

2c17589f1651baff9b82aa431850e296455777be265c2c5446c902e9

This hash will identify our image when our Golem application is run. Please copy and save it somewhere as in the requestor agent code, we will need to pass it to the Engine in order to have providers use the correct image for the container instances.

The details of docker image conversion are described here:

The requestor agent code

Let's look at the core of our hashcat example - the requestor agent. Please check the yacat.py file below.

The critical fragments of yacat.py will be described in the following sections of the tutorial so now, you can just do a quick scan over the big code block below.

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import argparse
import asyncio
from datetime import datetime, timedelta
import math
from pathlib import Path
import sys
from tempfile import gettempdir
from typing import AsyncIterable, List, Optional
from yapapi import Golem, NoPaymentAccountError, Task, WorkContext, windows_event_loop_fix
from yapapi.events import CommandExecuted
from yapapi.log import enable_default_logger
from yapapi.payload import vm
from yapapi.rest.activity import CommandExecutionError
examples_dir = Path(__file__).resolve().parent.parent
sys.path.append(str(examples_dir))
from utils import (
build_parser,
TEXT_COLOR_CYAN,
TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT,
TEXT_COLOR_GREEN,
TEXT_COLOR_RED,
TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW,
)
HASHCAT_ATTACK_MODE = 3 # stands for mask attack, hashcat -a option
KEYSPACE_OUTPUT_PATH = Path("/golem/output/keyspace")
# Ideally, this value should depend on the chunk size
MASK_ATTACK_TIMEOUT: timedelta = timedelta(minutes=30)
KEYSPACE_TIMEOUT: timedelta = timedelta(minutes=10)
arg_parser = build_parser("Run a hashcat attack (mask mode) on Golem network.")
arg_parser.epilog = (
"Example invocation: ./yacat.py --mask '?a?a?a' --hash '$P$5ZDzPE45CLLhEx/72qt3NehVzwN2Ry/'"
)
arg_parser.add_argument("--hash", type=str, help="Target hash to be cracked", required=True)
arg_parser.add_argument(
"--mask",
type=str,
help="Hashcat mask to be used for the attack. Example: a value of '?a?a?a' will "
"try all 3-character combinations, where each character is mixalpha-numeric "
"(lower and upper-case letters + digits) or a special character",
required=True,
)
arg_parser.add_argument(
"--chunk-size", # affects skip and limit hashcat parameters
type=int,
help="Limit for the number of words to be checked as part of a single activity",
default=4096,
)
arg_parser.add_argument(
"--hash-type",
type=int,
help="Type of hashing algorithm to use (hashcat -m option). Default: 400 (phpass)",
default=400,
)
arg_parser.add_argument(
"--max-workers",
type=int,
help="The maximum number of nodes we want to perform the attack on (default is dynamic)",
default=None,
)
# Container object for parsed arguments
args = argparse.Namespace()
async def compute_keyspace(context: WorkContext, tasks: AsyncIterable[Task]):
"""Worker script which computes the size of the keyspace for the mask attack.
This function is used as the `worker` parameter to `Golem#execute_tasks`.
It represents a sequence of commands to be executed on a remote provider node.
"""
async for task in tasks:
cmd = f"hashcat --keyspace " f"-a {HASHCAT_ATTACK_MODE} -m {args.hash_type} {args.mask}"
context.run("/bin/bash", "-c", cmd)
try:
future_result = yield context.commit(timeout=KEYSPACE_TIMEOUT)
# each item is the result of a single command on the provider (including setup commands)
result: List[CommandExecuted] = await future_result
# we take the last item since it's the last command that was executed on the provider
cmd_result: CommandExecuted = result[-1]
keyspace = int(cmd_result.stdout)
task.accept_result(result=keyspace)
except CommandExecutionError as e:
raise RuntimeError(f"Failed to compute attack keyspace: {e}")
async def perform_mask_attack(ctx: WorkContext, tasks: AsyncIterable[Task]):
"""Worker script which performs a hashcat mask attack against a target hash.
This function is used as the `worker` parameter to `Golem#execute_tasks`.
It represents a sequence of commands to be executed on a remote provider node.
"""
async for task in tasks:
skip = task.data
limit = skip + args.chunk_size
output_name = f"yacat_{skip}.potfile"
worker_output_path = f"/golem/output/{output_name}"
ctx.run(f"/bin/sh", "-c", _make_attack_command(skip, limit, worker_output_path))
try:
output_file = Path(gettempdir()) / output_name
ctx.download_file(worker_output_path, str(output_file))
yield ctx.commit(timeout=MASK_ATTACK_TIMEOUT)
with output_file.open() as f:
result = f.readline()
task.accept_result(result)
finally:
output_file.unlink()
def _make_attack_command(skip: int, limit: int, output_path: str) -> str:
return (
f"touch {output_path}; "
f"hashcat -a {HASHCAT_ATTACK_MODE} -m {args.hash_type} "
f"--self-test-disable --potfile-disable "
f"--skip={skip} --limit={limit} -o {output_path} "
f"'{args.hash}' '{args.mask}' || true"
)
def _parse_result(potfile_line: str) -> Optional[str]:
"""Helper function which parses a single .potfile line and returns the password part.
Hashcat uses its .potfile format to report results. In this format, each line consists of the
hash and its matching word, separated with a colon (e.g. `asdf1234:password`).
"""
if potfile_line:
return potfile_line.split(":")[-1].strip()
return None
async def main(args):
package = await vm.repo(
image_hash="055911c811e56da4d75ffc928361a78ed13077933ffa8320fb1ec2db",
min_mem_gib=0.5,
min_storage_gib=2.0,
)
async with Golem(
budget=10.0,
subnet_tag=args.subnet_tag,
driver=args.driver,
network=args.network,
) as golem:
print(
f"Using subnet: {TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}{args.subnet_tag}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}, "
f"payment driver: {TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}{golem.driver}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}, "
f"and network: {TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}{golem.network}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}\n"
)
start_time = datetime.now()
completed = golem.execute_tasks(
compute_keyspace,
[Task(data="compute_keyspace")],
payload=package,
max_workers=1,
timeout=KEYSPACE_TIMEOUT,
)
keyspace = 0
async for task in completed:
keyspace = task.result
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_CYAN}"
f"Task computed: keyspace size count. The keyspace size is {keyspace}"
f"{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
data = [Task(data=c) for c in range(0, keyspace, args.chunk_size)]
max_workers = args.max_workers or math.ceil(keyspace / args.chunk_size) // 2
completed = golem.execute_tasks(
perform_mask_attack,
data,
payload=package,
max_workers=max_workers,
timeout=MASK_ATTACK_TIMEOUT,
)
password = None
async for task in completed:
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_CYAN}Task computed: {task}, result: {task.result}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
result = _parse_result(task.result)
if result:
password = result
if password:
print(f"{TEXT_COLOR_GREEN}Password found: {password}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}")
else:
print(f"{TEXT_COLOR_RED}No password found{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}")
print(f"{TEXT_COLOR_CYAN}Total time: {datetime.now() - start_time}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}")
if __name__ == "__main__":
args = arg_parser.parse_args()
# This is only required when running on Windows with Python prior to 3.8:
windows_event_loop_fix()
enable_default_logger(log_file=args.log_file)
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
task = loop.create_task(main(args))
try:
loop.run_until_complete(task)
except NoPaymentAccountError as e:
handbook_url = (
"https://handbook.golem.network/requestor-tutorials/"
"flash-tutorial-of-requestor-development"
)
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_RED}"
f"No payment account initialized for driver `{e.required_driver}` "
f"and network `{e.required_network}`.\n\n"
f"See {handbook_url} on how to initialize payment accounts for a requestor node."
f"{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}"
"Shutting down gracefully, please wait a short while "
"or press Ctrl+C to exit immediately..."
f"{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
task.cancel()
try:
loop.run_until_complete(task)
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}Shutdown completed, thank you for waiting!{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
pass

So what is happening here?

We start with a high-level overview of the steps performed by the requestor agent. In the next section we'll dig into the implementation details.

Compute keyspace size

The first step in the computation is to check the keyspace size. For this we only need to execute hashcat with --keyspace, as show in the section Doing things in parallel and read that command's output.

Define the tasks

Knowing the keyspace size we define the list of tasks to execute on providers. Recall from the section Doing things in parallel that we can run hashcat on a fragment of the whole keyspace, using the --skip and --limit parameters. In this step for each such fragment we define a separate task.

Knowing the number of tasks we can also determine the number of providers required to execute them in parallel. In this example we decided that the number of providers contracted for the work will be equal to the number of tasks divided by two. This does not necessarily mean that every provider will get exactly two tasks, even if the overall number of tasks is even, because:

When a provider is ready to execute a task, it takes up the next task from a common pool of tasks, so a fast provider may end up executing more tasks than a slow one.

Perform mask attack

Next, we can start looking for the password using multiple workers, executing the tasks on multiple providers at the same time.

In order to look for passwords in the given keyspace range, for each of the workers employed to perform our job, we are executing the following steps:

  • Executehashcat with proper --skip and --limit values on the provider

  • Get the hashcat_{skip}.potfile from the provider to the requestor

  • Parse the result from the .potfile

How does the code work?

The argument parser

The first big chunk of code, after imports and constants, is the definition of the argument parser that uses the argparse module for Python's standard library. The parser will allow us to pass arguments such as --mask and --max-workers, and it will print a nice argument description and an example invocation when we run the requestor script with --help.

The main function

Let's now jump to the main function which contains the main body of the requestor app. Its sole argument, args, contains information on the command-line arguments read by the argument parser.

async def main(args):

Package definition

To tell the Golem platform what our requirements against the providers are, we are using the package object. The image_hash parameter points to the image that we want the containers to run - here we use the hash received from gvmkit-build. The min_mem_gib and min_storage_gib parameters specify memory and storage requirements for the provider.

package = await vm.repo(
image_hash="055911c811e56da4d75ffc928361a78ed13077933ffa8320fb1ec2db",
min_mem_gib=0.5,
min_storage_gib=2.0,
)

Golem engine

To run our tasks on the Golem network we need to create a Golem instance.

async with Golem(
budget=10.0,
subnet_tag=args.subnet_tag,
driver=args.driver,
network=args.network,
) as golem:

The arguments are as follows:

  • budgetdefines maximal spendings for executing all the tasks with Golem

  • subnet_tag specifies the providers subnet to be used; it's best to leave the default value in place unless you mean to run your own network of test providers to test the app against,

  • next are the driver and network parameters that select the Ethereum blockchain and the payment driver for you; for example, you would not use the mainnet network for tests but you'll probably want to run the real-live tasks on the mainnet to be able to use all the providers that participate in the Golem network.

First call to execute_tasks: Computing keyspace size

With Golem instance running we may proceed with sending tasks to providers. For this we use the execute_tasks method.

completed = golem.execute_tasks(
compute_keyspace,
[Task(data="compute_keyspace")],
payload=package,
max_workers=1,
timeout=KEYSPACE_TIMEOUT,
)

This call tells Golem to execute a single task Task(data="compute_keyspace"). The task's data is not really used for keyspace size computation, it will be however printed to the console when the requestor app logs its progress, so we set it to be an informative description of the task.

The other arguments are:

  • the worker function that tells Golem what steps to perform on a provider in order to execute the tasks (in our case, there's only one task); here we pass the compute_keyspace function,

  • the package that we defined before,

  • the maximum number of worker instances we'd like to create -- or the maximum number of providers we want the tasks to be distributed to (for executing just one task it makes no sense to request more than one provider, so it's a bit redundant),

  • the total timeout for executing all tasks.

Due to limitations of the current Golem market implementation, please use timeout value between 8 minutes and 3 hours.

You can also specify the timeout value for the particular provider-side execution batch that is triggered by ctx.commit(timeout=...).

The keyspace size can be read from the result attribute of the executed task. We use async for loop here to iterate over the completed tasks (even though we expect only one task).

async for task in completed:
keyspace = task.result

Second call to execute_tasks: Performing the attack

Now we can split the whole keyspace into chunks of size args.chunk_size. For each chunk we create a separate Task. We've also decided to use the number of providers equal to the number of tasks divided by 2, so we define max_workers accordingly:

data = [Task(data=c) for c in range(0, keyspace, args.chunk_size)]
max_workers = args.max_workers or math.ceil(keyspace / args.chunk_size) // 2

With the list of tasks prepared, we call golem.execute_tasks once more. This time, our worker function is perform_mask_attack:

completed = golem.execute_tasks(
perform_mask_attack,
data,
payload=package,
max_workers=max_workers,
timeout=MASK_ATTACK_TIMEOUT,
)

Each completed task will contain hashcat's output for the keyspace chunk represented by the task. We can parse this output using the auxiliary parse_result function:

async for task in completed:
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_CYAN}Task computed: {task}, result: {task.result}{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
result = _parse_result(task.result)
if result:
password = result

Worker functions

With the main function covered, let's now have a look at the worker functions compute_keyspace and perform_mask_attack. Recall that worker functions are passed as arguments to execute_tasks, and are called once for each provider on which tasks are executed (more precisely, once for each activity, but in a typical scenario, including the current example, each provider executes just one activity).

compute_keyspace

The first worker is similar to the one that we've seen in Hello World! example, but the command we need to run on the provider is not date but hashcat with appropriate options:

hashcat --keyspace -a {HASHCAT_ATTACK_MODE} -m {args.hash_type} {args.mask}

This instructs hashcat to compute and print the keyspace size. The following code sends the command to the provider, waits until it completes, and retrieves it's standard output:

cmd = f"hashcat --keyspace " f"-a {HASHCAT_ATTACK_MODE} -m {args.hash_type} {args.mask}"
context.run("/bin/bash", "-c", cmd)
try:
future_result = yield context.commit(timeout=KEYSPACE_TIMEOUT)
# each item is the result of a single command on the provider (including setup commands)
result: List[CommandExecuted] = await future_result
# we take the last item since it's the last command that was executed on the provider
cmd_result: CommandExecuted = result[-1]
keyspace = int(cmd_result.stdout)
task.accept_result(result=keyspace)
except CommandExecutionError as e:
raise RuntimeError(f"Failed to compute attack keyspace: {e}")

perform_mask_attack

The second worker function, perform_mask_attack is more interesting. Unlike compute_keyspace, we make use of the data attribute that each task carries and use it to set --skip and --limitparameters to hashcat:

async for task in tasks:
skip = task.data
limit = skip + args.chunk_size
worker_output_path = f"/golem/output/hashcat_{skip}.potfile"
ctx.run(f"/bin/sh", "-c", _make_attack_command(skip, limit, worker_output_path))

The commands here are passed to an explicitly referenced /bin/sh shell. That's because any commands specified within ctx.run() are not, by themselves, run inside any shell.

The exact command to be run spans multiple lines so we construct it in a separate function _make_attack_command to make the worker code easier to follow. Let's take a look!

def _make_attack_command(skip: int, limit: int, output_path: str) -> str:
return (
f"touch {output_path}; "
f"hashcat -a {HASHCAT_ATTACK_MODE} -m {args.hash_type} "
f"--self-test-disable --potfile-disable "
f"--skip={skip} --limit={limit} -o {output_path} "
f"'{args.hash}' '{args.mask}' || true"
)

Couple of things to note here. The command touch {output_path} is there to make sure that the file {output_path} exists even if hashcat does not write any output (that happens if it does not find any password matching given hash).

The trailing || true is a standard trick to make sure that the exit code from the whole command is always 0-- hashcat returns a non-zero exit code if it fails to find any matching password and it causes the exe unit to report a command error to the requestor.

The option -o {output_path} tells hashcat to write output to a file. In the worker function we download the contents of this file to a temporary file created on the requestor:

output_file = Path(gettempdir()) / output_name
ctx.download_file(worker_output_path, output_file.name)

The first line of this file (or the empty string) becomes the result of the completed task:

with output_file.open() as f:
result = f.readline()
task.accept_result(result)

Running main in the event loop

Golem high-level API that we use to interact with the Golem network uses asynchronous programming a lot. The asynchronous execution starting point is the line

loop.run_until_complete(task)

which schedules execution of main(args) in the event loop.

We catch the KeyboardInterrupt twice because after normal break, we ideally want the code to finalize the cleanup but if the user is determined to break the execution at all cost, we'd like to catch the exception there too:

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
task = loop.create_task(main(args))
try:
loop.run_until_complete(task)
except NoPaymentAccountError as e:
handbook_url = (
"https://handbook.golem.network/requestor-tutorials/"
"flash-tutorial-of-requestor-development"
)
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_RED}"
f"No payment account initialized for driver `{e.required_driver}` "
f"and network `{e.required_network}`.\n\n"
f"See {handbook_url} on how to initialize payment accounts for a requestor node."
f"{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}"
"Shutting down gracefully, please wait a short while "
"or press Ctrl+C to exit immediately..."
f"{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
task.cancel()
try:
loop.run_until_complete(task)
print(
f"{TEXT_COLOR_YELLOW}Shutdown completed, thank you for waiting!{TEXT_COLOR_DEFAULT}"
)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
pass

Now, as we know how yacat.py works, let's run it!

Example run

While in the /examples/yacat directory, type the following:

python3 yacat.py --mask 'a?a?a' --hash '$P$5ZDzPE45CLLhEx/72qt3NehVzwN2Ry/'

Please note that on Windows, you need to:

  • use python instead of python3

  • not use the quote character in the command

So the windows version is:

python yacat.py ?a?a?a $P$5ZDzPE45CLLhEx/72qt3NehVzwN2Ry/

The above run should return "pas" as the recovered password.

A more computation-intensive example is:

python3 yacat.py --mask '?a?a?a?a' --hash '$H$5ZDzPE45C.e3TjJ2Qi58Aaozha6cs30' --chunk-size 10000

The above command should execute 86 tasks on up to 43 providers and return "ABCD".

yacat.py supports a few optional parameters. To get help on those, please type:

python3 yacat.py --help

One of the interesting options is to have log output to a file. This can be achieved by adding the following option to the yacat.py run:

--log-file LOG_FILE_NAME

Other languages support

The yacat example is written in Python using Golem's Python High-Level API (YAPAPI). Golem currently supports writing requestor agents using JavaScript/TypeScript High-Level API (YAJAPI) also.

Next steps

The complete reference of the Python High-Level API (yapapi) is available here:

You can also have a look at our JavaScript/TypeScript API if you're interested in developing your requestor agent in JS/TS:

https://github.com/golemfactory/yajsapi

Closing words

Golem is waiting to serve your applications. Our decentralized - and open to everyone - platform is here (now in alpha).

We did our best to make developing Golem applications super easy.

Now it's time for your move!

And remember:

In case of any doubts or problems, you can always contact us on discord.

https://chat.golem.network